Organizing
Committee
  Congress
Information
  Program   Participation   Sponsorship
& Exhibition
  Travel Information
Program
Invited Faculty
> Program > Invited Faculty

Paolo PELOSI , Italy / Full Professor in Anesthesiology


Department of Surgical Sciences and Integrated Diagnostics (DISC)
University of Genoa
[Educational Background]
 • Graduated in Medicine and Surgery, University of Milan, Italy 1988
 • Specialized in Anesthesiology,  University of Milan, Italy,1992

[Work Experience]
 • Clinical Assistant in Anesthesiology, San Gerardo Hospital, Monza, Italy 1990-1993
 • Research Fellow in Anesthesiology, University of Milan 1993-1998
 • Associate Professor in Anesthesiology, University of Insubria, Varese, Italy 1999-2010
 • Full Professor in Anesthesiology, University of Genoa, Italy 2010 till now
 • Head of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, IRCCS San Martino IST 2010-till now

[Publications Featuring Your Research Findings within Last 5 Years]
List of top 10 publications: all authors, title, journal, citation number with one to two sentences describing the important of 
the reference.
From Scopus, Prof. Paolo Pelosi has reported (12/0772014):
  - 327 papers in PubMed and Scopus
  - 11533 total citations in Scopus
h-index (Web of Science): 
  - 47 (from Scopus)

  1. Gattinoni L, D'Andrea L, Pelosi P, Vitale G, Pesenti A, Fumagalli R. Regional effects and mechanism of positive end-
      expiratory pressure in early adult respiratory distress syndrome. Gattinoni L, D'Andrea L, Pelosi P, Vitale G, Pesenti 
      A, Fumagalli R. JAMA. 1993 Apr 28269(16):2122-7 (279 citations)
      This paper showed that the regional effects of PEEP are heterogeneous from non dependent to dependent lung 
      regionas. Thus PEEP should be individually titrated in patients with different degrees of severity of ARDS
  2. Pelosi P, D'Andrea L, Vitale G, Pesenti A, Gattinoni L. Vertical gradient of regional lung inflation in adult respiratory 
      distress syndrome. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1994 Jan149(1):8-13. (210 citations)
      In this study, we developed the concept of the “sponge model” in ARDS. This model is actually valid and it has not 
      been generally challanged till now. Briefly the ARDS lungi s composed by aerated lung regions (mainly located in 
      non dependent areas), consolidated lung regions ( widespread  distributed along the vertical gradient) and 
      atelectatic lung regions (prevalent in dependent lung regions): Higher is the alveolar-capillary lesions, higher is the 
      edema, higher the atelectasis and higher the overall mortality. The concept of the “sponge model “ was important in 
      the pathophysiological and clinical research in ARDS, promoting the innovative concepts of protective mechanical 
      ventilation, prone position and optimization of PEEP and recruitment.
  3. Gattinoni L, Bombino M, Pelosi P, Lissoni A, Pesenti A, Fumagalli R, Tagliabue M. Lung structure and function in 
      different stages of severe adult respiratory distress syndrome. JAMA. 1994 Jun 8271(22):1772-9. (240 citations)
      This study investigated the evolution of pulmonary structure changes at different stages of ARDS. The results are of 
      particular importance for imporving the understanding of pathophysiological knowledge of the evolution of ARDS.
  4. Gattinoni L, Brazzi L, Pelosi P, Latini R, Tognoni G, Pesenti A, Fumagalli R. A trial of goal-oriented hemodynamic 
      therapy in critically ill patients. SvO2 Collaborative Group. N Engl J Med. 1995 Oct 19333(16):1025-32 (904 citations)
      The first large RCT investigating the role of ScO2 for hemodynamic optimization and monitoring in critically ill patients. 
      We found no major positive effects of supranormal optimization of hemodynamics, as well as the SvO2 monitoring. 
      These results have been confirmed in more recent large RCTs.
  5. Pelosi P, Cereda M, Foti G, Giacomini M, Pesenti A. Alterations of lung and chest wall mechanics in patients with 
      acute lung injury: effects of positive end-expiratory pressure. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1995 Aug152(2):531-7 (358 
      citations)
      The first physiological pioneristic study published on the role and importance of esophageal and transpulmonary 
      pressure estimation in mechanically ventilated patients with ARDS. The results of this study were successively 
      confirmed by other studies and now esophageal pressure measurement is considered as an important tool to better 
      optimize ventilatory setting in ARDS and in patients difficult to ventilate.
  6. Gattinoni L, Pelosi P, Suter PM, Pedoto A, Vercesi P, Lissoni A. Acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by 
      pulmonary and extrapulmonary disease. Different syndromes? Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1998 Jul158(1):3-11 (481 
      citations)
      Important study showing that the mechanical properties of the lung and chest wall as well as potential of recruitment 
      might be different in different ategories of patients with ARDS. 
  7. Pelosi P, Croci M, Ravagnan I, Tredici S, Pedoto A, Lissoni A, Gattinoni L. The effects of body mass on lung 
      volumes, respiratory mechanics, and gas exchange during general anesthesia. Anesth Analg. 1998 Sep87(3):654-60. 
      (243 citations)
      This study clearly showed that the mechanical properties and modalities of ventilation are different according to the 
      body mass.
  8. Pelosi P, Tubiolo D, Mascheroni D, Vicardi P, Crotti S, Valenza F, Gattinoni L. Effects of the prone position on 
      respiratory mechanics and gas exchange during acute lung injury. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1998 Feb157(2):387-
      93 (246 citations)
      Prone position was found effective to improve gas exchange, mechanics and lead to less ventilator induced lung 
      injury in ARDS. We also found that the chest wall mechanics played a relevant role to determine the beneficial effects 
      of prone position. The results of this study were of fundamental importance to better design RCTs definitely showing 
      the beneficial effects of prone position on outcome in severe ARDS.
  9. Pelosi P, Cadringher P, Bottino N, Panigada M, Carrieri F, Riva E, Lissoni A, Gattinoni L. Sigh in acute respiratory 
      distress syndrome. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1999 Mar159(3):872-80. (239 citations)
      This was the first study showing  that the repetitive recruitment maneuvres and non monotonous ventilation might be 
      effective to improve lung function and minimize Ventilator Induced Lung Injury in ARDS. The results of this study 
      stimulated interest to develop new techniques like noisy and variable controlled and pressure support ventilation in 
      ARDS.
 10. Pelosi P, Ravagnan I, Giurati G, Panigada M, Bottino N, Tredici S, Eccher G, Gattinoni L. Positive end-expiratory       
      pressure improves respiratory function in obese but not in normal subjects during anesthesia and paralysis. 
      Anesthesiology. 1999 Nov91(5):1221-31(193 citations)
      Pioneristic study on the effects of protective mechanical ventilation in non injured lungs and in obese patients       
      undergoing mechanical ventilation.
 11. Gattinoni L, Tognoni G, Pesenti A, Taccone P, Mascheroni D, Labarta V, Malacrida R, Di Giulio P, Fumagalli R, 
      Pelosi P, Brazzi L, Latini R Prone-Supine Study Group. Effect of prone positioning on the survival of patients with 
      acute respiratory failure. N Engl J Med. 2001 Aug 23345(8):568-73. (639 citations)
      First large RCT investigating the clinical effects of prone position in ARDS on clinical outcome. 
 12. Putensen C, Theuerkauf N, Zinserling J, Wrigge H, Pelosi P. Meta-analysis: ventilation strategies and outcomes of 
      the acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute lung injury. Ann Intern Med. 2009 Oct 20151(8):566-76 (101 
      citations)
      Important and definitive metaanalysis showing the beneficial effects of low tidal volume but not high PEEP and 
      recruitment to improve outcome and reduce mortality in ARDS. This study first showed that high PEEP might be 
      beneficial only in most severe cases of ARDS.
 13. Chidini G, Calderini E, Cesana BM, Gandini C, Prandi E, Pelosi P. Noninvasive continuous positive airway pressure 
      in acute respiratory failure: helmet versus facial mask. Pediatrics. 2010 Aug126(2):e330-6.
      Pioneristic study on the use of helmet to deliver non invasive CPAP in infants with acute respiratory failure and 
      bronchiolitis. This study stimulated the dsign of a new larger RCT showing that helmet by CPAP is beneficial in 
      infants with bronchiolitis, likely changing clinical practice.
 14. Pearse RM, Moreno RP, Bauer P, Pelosi P, Metnitz P, Spies C, Vallet B, Vincent JL, Hoeft A, Rhodes A European 
      Surgical Outcomes Study (EuSOS) group for the Trials groups of the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine 
      and the European Society of Anaesthesiology. Mortality after surgery in Europe: a 7 day cohort study. Lancet. 2012 
      Sep 22380(9847):1059-65 (90 citations)
      Very important study performed in a large cohort of patients showing that postoperative mortality is higher than 
      expected in Europe and identifying potential risk factors and among them focusing on respiratory failure.
 15. Severgnini P, Selmo G, Lanza C, Chiesa A, Frigerio A, Bacuzzi A, Dionigi G, Novario R, Gregoretti C, de Abreu MG,       
      Schultz MJ, Jaber S, Futier E, Chiaranda M, Pelosi P. Protective mechanical ventilation during general anesthesia 
      for open abdominal surgery improves postoperative pulmonary function. Anesthesiology. 2013 Jun118(6):1307-21. (26       
      citations)
      Pioneristic pilot study showing the beneficial effects of protective mechanical ventilation during surgery in high risk 
      patients to improve postoperative clinical outcome. This study stimulated research in this field with major changes in 
      clinical practice (see also additional comments on PROVHILO study below, published on Lancet 2014)

Further important papers recently published in 2014, are the following:
 • The PROVE Network Investigators for the Clinical Trial Network of the European Society of Anaesthesiology (Pelosi P., 
      Hemmes S., Schultz M.J., de Abreu M.G., principal investigators). High versus low positive end-expiratory pressure 
      during general anaesthesia for open abdominal surgery (PROVHILO trial): a multicentre randomised controlled trial. 
      Lancet. 2014 May 30. pii: S0140-6736(14)60416-5
      Extremely important and definite study on the effects of protective mechanical ventilation during surgery in high-risk 
      surgery. Conclusions: Anesthesiologists should ventilate during surgery with low tidal volume, low PEEP and no 
      recruitment maneuvers to improve outcome and reduce pulmonary complications in the postoperative period. This 
      study changed the clinical treatment all over the world with relevant practical implications in a large number of 
      patients undergoing surgery and at high risk of postoperative pulmonary complications.
 • Akoumianaki E, Maggiore SM, Valenza F, Bellani G, Jubran A, Loring SH, Pelosi P, Talmor D, Grasso S, Chiumello D, 
      Guérin C, Patroniti N, Ranieri VM, Gattinoni L, Nava S, Terragni PP, Pesenti A, Tobin M, Mancebo J, Brochard L. 
      The application of esophageal pressure measurement in patients with respiratory failure. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 
      2014 Mar 1189(5):520-31
      Very important review on the use of esophageal and transpulmonary pressure measurements for optimizing ventilation 
      setting in ARDS. This study is the final result of my personal finding on the use of the esophageal pressure in ARDS 
      from 1995 (see previous paper quoted above). This reference is going to change clinical practice in ARDS. 
 • Mazo V, Sabaté S, Canet J, Gallart L, Gama de Abreu M, Belda J, Langeron O, Hoeft A, Pelosi P. Prospective External 
      Validation of a Predictive Score for Postoperative Pulmonary Complications. Anesthesiology. 2014 Jun 4. [Epub 
      ahead of print]
      Important paper showing the importance of pulmonary complications to determine outcome in the post-operative       
      period. Furthermore, we developed and validated in a large cohort of subjects a simple pre-operative index to predict 
      those patients at higher risk to develop postoperative pulmonary complications. These data are relevant to better 
      organize the diagnostics and organizational tools in the hospital to optimize resources and improve clinical outcome 
      of surgical patients.
 • Brambilla AM, Aliberti S, Prina E, Nicoli F, Forno MD, Nava S, Ferrari G, Corradi F, Pelosi P, Bignamini A, Tarsia P,  
      Cosentini R. Helmet CPAP vs. oxygen therapy in severe hypoxemic respiratory failure due to pneumonia. Intensive 
      Care Med. 2014 Jul40(7):942-9. doi: 10.1007/s00134-014-3325-5. Epub 2014 May 10.
      This is the most recent RCT from our group showing that CPAP by helmet in the emergency, reduced the risk of 
      intubation in patients with severe CAP. This study should be considered to possibly change clinical practice in the 
      next future, although the present results should be confirmed in future large powered studies. This study was 
      performed together with Dr. Cosentini R. and Brambilla A.M. and other Colleagues involved in Emergency and 
      Respiratory Medicine. 
 • Annborn M, Bro-Jeppesen J, Nielsen N, Ullén S, Kjaergaard J, Hassager C, Wanscher M, Hovdenes J, Pellis T, Pelosi 
      P, Wise MP, Cronberg T, Erlinge D, Friberg H The TTM-trial investigators. The association of targeted temperature       
      management at 33 and 36 °C with outcome in patients with moderate shock on admission after out-of-hospital cardiac 
      arrest: a post hoc analysis of the Target Temperature Management trial. Intensive Care Med. 2014 Jul 8. [Epub 
      ahead of print]
      This study investigated the role of moderate hypothermia to improve outcome in patients after cardiac arrest. 
 • Sutherasan Y, Vargas M, Pelosi P. Protective mechanical ventilation in the non-injured lung: review and meta-
      analysis.Crit Care. 2014 Mar 1818(2):211.
      Most recent metaanalysis showing the importance of protective mechanical ventilation to improve outcome and 
      minimize Ventilator  Induced Lung Injury in mechanically ventilated patients without lung injury.

[Honors/Awards]
 • President of the European Society of Anesthesiology (ESA 2010-2011), Head of the Critical Care Assembly European 
    Respiratory Society (ERS) 2010-2013